Some FAQs about the upcoming conference

The Conference programme will begin at 16:00 on Tuesday 6th September and will close at 18:00 on Friday 9th September.

The conference will be held on the main campus of the University of Exeter: Streatham Campus in Exeter. A map is available here.

Accommodation will be available on the Streatham campus of Exeter University at the price of approx. £55.83 per night (Bed and Breakfast = B&B). Accessible rooms are available (e.g. rooms which are step-free).

You are of course welcome to book other accommodation in the city of Exeter if you prefer.

A booking form for the conference, for B&B accommodation and extra evening meals will be available very soon: keep an eye on this page.

Travel to Exeter University:  please find further information here.

Train: the nearest rail station to Exeter University is Exeter St David’s station. This is the main line station with a direct connection to London Paddington station (approx 2 hours 15 mins).  (Exeter “Central” station is on a local branch line and is not very close to campus.)

Exeter St David’s station is a 15 minute walk to the Streatham campus. It is well-sign-posted but it is up a steep hill. There are taxis available at the station if you prefer.

Flying: If you are flying to the UK you have several options:

1. Fly to one of the London airports and travel to Exeter by train (St David’s train station) or coach. Details on train and coach connections can be found here  under the ‘Public transport’ tab.

2. Fly to Bristol airport which receives a number of international flights. Travel from Bristol Airport to Exeter by taking a bus to Bristol Temple Meads rail station and a train from there to Exeter St David’s rail station. See public transport options here  .

3. Fly to Exeter airport which offers a very limited number of international flights. Travel to Exeter University campus by taxi.  See the ‘by plane’ information on this page here.

Taxis: Apple Taxis Exeter (01392 666666) offices at both Exeter St David’s rail station and Exeter International Airport.

 

 

Two new calls for papers! Short communications (re-opened call) and doctoral workshop (new call)

  1. Call for Short communications (re-opened call)

Recognising that many people were not have been in a position to make a proposal last autumn, the committee is re-opening its invitation for proposals for short communications relating to Gregory of Nyssa’s De anima et resurrectione. Possible themes include:-

  • Gregory’s soteriology, eschatology and theological anthropology as relating to De anima et resurrectione;
  • Gregory’s theological, philosophical and literary influences, as relating to De anima et resurrectione;
  • the role of Macrina in Gregory’s writings;
  • comparisons between De anima et resurrectione and other texts and thinkers;
  • the translation, reception and after-life of De anima et resurrectione and/or its key ideas.

Short communications at the conference will take 20 minutes max. with 7 minutes for questions. Provision will be made for a limited number of communications to be made on-line for those who are otherwise unable to attend the conference.

Please send your abstract of not more than 300 words on the form (accessed here: call for papers Spring 2022) to gregoryofnyssacolloquium@gmail.com by 12 noon on Friday 27th May 2022.

  1. Call for applications to the doctoral workshop

Following the successful doctoral workshops at the colloquia in Rome and Paris, the committee invite proposals from current doctoral students to join the doctoral workshop in Exeter.

Purpose / structure of the workshop:

Successful applicants will be given the opportunity to discuss their work with a more experienced scholar in the field, who will have read a sample of their work in advance. Each workshop session will include several such discussions, so that students can learn from their peers as well as from their appointed mentor. Successful applicants will be expected to attend the whole conference. Provision will be made for some students to attend on-line if they are unable to attend in person.

Eligibility:

  • You will be a student at any stage of your doctoral programme prior to your final examination.
  • You will be writing a doctoral dissertation on Gregory of Nyssa, or on early Christian eschatology or on related authors or themes (e.g. on one of the other Cappadocians, or on philosophy and theology in the fourth century).
  • If your proposal is successful, you will need to submit a piece of work relating to your doctoral dissertation by 15th July 2022. This piece of writing should be 5,000 words maximum. It could be e.g. a detailed research proposal/chapter plan, a summary of research findings so far, or one chapter/part of one chapter.

How to apply:

Please send the following to gregoryofnyssacolloquium@gmail.com by 12 noon on 27th May 2022:

  • application form (accessed here: call for doctoral workshop Spring 2022 ) with the title of your dissertation and an explanation of what work you would submit if you were chosen for the workshop;
  • a brief CV (one or two pages);
  • a brief letter of recommendation from your doctoral supervisor (no more than one page).

For both calls:

  • The languages of the conference are: English, French, German, Italian and Spanish; proposals and papers are accepted in any of these languages.
  • The committee will inform you whether your proposal has been accepted by Friday 10th June 2022

We look forward to welcoming you to the colloquium!

Morwenna Ludlow, Richard Flower, Brandon Gallaher, Gabriele Galluzzo, Emma Loosley Leeming

 

Gregory of Nyssa’s ‘De anima et resurrectione’: Call for papers

The committee of the 15th International Colloquium invites proposals for papers. Possible themes include:-

  • Gregory’s soteriology, eschatology and theological anthropology as relating to De anima et resurrectione;
  • Gregory’s theological, philosophical and literary influences, as relating to De anima et resurrectione;
  • the role of Macrina in Gregory’s writings;
  • comparisons between De anima et resurrectione and other texts and thinkers;
  • the translation, reception and after-life of De anima et resurrectione and/or its key ideas.

Proposals are invited for the two following kinds of communication:-

  1. Plenary lectures: a maximum of 40 minutes, with 5 minutes for questions.
  2. Short communications: a maximum of 20 minutes, with 7 minutes for questions.

The languages of the conference are: English, French, German, Italian and Spanish; proposals and papers are accepted in any of these languages.

Please send your abstract of not more than 300 words on the form below by Friday 26th November.

The committee will inform you whether your proposal has been accepted by 14th January 2022.

Please note:- 

  • PhD students may submit a proposal for a short paper. However, there will also be a later call for applications to the PhD student workshops, which will include any aspect of the study of Gregory of Nyssa. We recommend you aim to speak on a topic closely related to your dissertation.
  • The conference proceedings will be published, but acceptance of a paper for the conference does not guarantee publication: there will be a separate process of selection for the volume.

We look forward to welcoming you to the colloquium!

Morwenna Ludlow, Richard Flower, Brandon Gallaher, Gabriele Galluzzo, Emma Loosley Leeming

 

Please download the proposal form here [form is on second page]:-

call for papers

 

Save the date!

Gregory of Nyssa, mosaic from La Martorana, Palermo

We can confirm the dates for the 15th International Colloquium at the University of Exeter, United Kingdom.

Tuesday 6th – Friday 9th September 2022

A call for papers will be issued next week. We expect to meet in person, but we are also planning to make some aspects of the colloquium accessible to those who might not be able to travel. We are, of course, keeping a close eye on the current situation.

We look forward to welcoming you to the colloquium!

Morwenna Ludlow

University of Exeter

Image: Gregory of Nyssa, mosaic from La Martorana, Palermo. Credit: N.P. Ludlow